Gabriel’s Oboe

The Mission

Today on my playlist, Gabriel’s Oboe broke through. The first time I heard this music while watching the movie The Mission, I searched it out and listened over and over and over. Today it offered me reason to pause, take in a deep breath, close my eyes, and become enthralled by the absorbing abundance of heaven. Ennio “Maestro” Morricone, a native Italian, composed the music. The music carries an exquisite courageous beauty. It is elegant, refined, and sensitive, yet excruciating, piercing, and intense.  It astounds me!

The movie, The Mission, tells the (mostly) true story of 18th-century Jesuit missionaries who died defending Guarani Indians from Portuguese slavery in the South American jungle. The missionaries dream was a society in which Christian natives would live in harmony with the Spanish and Portuguese. The colonial governors found this vision to be dangerous; they would rather enslave the Indians than covert them. They issue orders for the mission to be destroyed. The brutal film depicts a French Jesuit’s dogged but ultimately failed work among the Iroquois, Algonquin, and Huron in 17th-century Quebec. The Mission is a deeply moving film that reminds us of the vitality of love, the miracle of grace, and the transforming power of acts of conscience. It is powerful, compelling, and spiritually stirring.

Coupled with the music, my emotions become intensely enmeshed. There are a few scenes in which I literally break down crying, but in the end I am overcome by a melancholy silence, a feeling like something profound and momentous has come to pass. The movie ranks as one of my top five.

Love you, mean it!